CLdN Continues to Add Capacity on Continent – UK Routes

By | 2020 Newsletter week 41 | No Comments

CLdN is to step up preparations for the end of the Brexit transitional phase on 31st December 2020 by introducing additional capacity on its UK routes.

  • Last week 25% extra capacity was added on both the Rotterdam – London and Rotterdam – Humberside routes.
  • In addition, and from week 42, an extra vessel will be deployed and thus a third daily sailing will be added on the Zeebrugge – London route to serve the growing demand.

One of the reasons for the high demand is the fact that British companies are preparing for a no-deal end of the Brexit transition period by stockpiling essential goods.

TECHNOLOGY

By | 2020 Newsletter week 33 | No Comments

News from our Sponsor Adonis: SeaDream Implements Adonis

After a lengthy selection and review process, SeaDream Yacht Club, the Norwegian cruise line is now installing Adonis’ market leading HR and payroll platform.

SeaDream is operating cruises in the western Norwegian fjords this summer (instead of the Mediterranean).  This means that the ships are easily accessible and the implementation project will be completed much quicker.

“Even though we currently only have two ships in operation, there is an urgent requirement to migrate to a new personnel administration solution. The opportunities presented by Adonis’ Self-Service module are significant and the value of this aspect will only increase as we roll it out through the company. The efficiencies this will bring will enable us to make significant time and cost savings for years to come,” says Jannik Madsen, Director Maritime Personnel Manager at SeaDream’s head office in Oslo.

INTERESTING

By | 2020 Newsletter week 33 | No Comments

U.K. Revives Operation Brock

The Brexit could create chaos, especially in the Dover area (Channel ferries and Eurotunnel).

The UK Department for Transport decided to resurrect Operation Brock, a traffic management system designed to limit tailbacks.

Therefore, it started a consultation round about proposed legislative amendments for enforcing traffic management plans for outbound heavy commercial vehicles in Kent after the EU transition period.

This consultation closes at 11:59pm on 23 August 2020

FERRY PORTS

By | 2020 Newsletter week 5 | No Comments

Brexit Affected Port of Calais and the Channel Tunnel

Port of Calais had a turbulent year 2019, with the following reasons:

  • Brexit
  • A strike from the customs
  • Weak GBP versus strong EUR = less tourism

Key figures:

  • -4.6% freight (1.8 million units), which means 90,000 less trucks.
  • -7.0% pax (8.5 million)
  • -8.7% cars (1.5 million)
  • -6.0% coaches

Brexit also affected Getlink (Channel Tunnel)

Key figures:

  • -6.0% freight (1.6 million units)
  • +1.0% Eurostar pax (11 million)
  • -2.0% cars (2.6 million)

Market share for trucks:

  • 46.0% Calais
  • 40.4% tunnel

DFDS Offers Passengers its Brexit Guarantee

By | 2019 Newsletter week 51 | No Comments

Following the 2019 general election result in the UK, DFDS has reminded its passengers they can continue to book to travel to the Continent with confidence.

Kasper Moos, Vice President and Head of Short Routes & Passenger, confirmed that the DFDS Brexit Guarantee will continue.

He said: “We created the Brexit Guarantee earlier this year so that people could rest assured their trips are safe with us and they can book with confidence. This guarantee means if you book direct you are able to cancel with no additional cost.

I want to reassure our passengers that we now expect an orderly transition for the UK to leave the EU which means that there will be no changes to passenger travel until the end of December 2020 at the earliest. At DFDS it is business as usual over the busy Christmas and New Year period. We will still be linking the UK to Europe, Brexit or no Brexit.”

Anyone with questions about their travel plans can get all the latest advice at the DFDS Brexit FAQs page www.dfds.com/en-gb/brexit.

FERRY FINANCE

By | 2019 Newsletter week 42 | No Comments

UK Government Signs Contracts Securing Continued Flow Of Vital Medicines After Brexit

The British government has signed freight capacity contracts that will help ensure vital medicines continue to enter the UK after Brexit, whatever the circumstances.

Following a robust procurement process, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps  announced on 11 October that Brittany Ferries, DFDS, P&O and Stena Line will be ready to deliver capacity equivalent to thousands of HGVs per week from 31 October.

INTERESTING READS

By | 2019 Newsletter week 41 | No Comments

Brexit: HMRC Impact Assessment For The Movement Of Goods If The UK Leaves The EU Without A Deal

 One of the conclusions of the document published by HM Customs and Revenue is that “UK supply chains face an additional £15 billion annual cost burden in the event of a no-deal Brexit.”

This is the third edition of the impact assessment that was first published on 4 December 2018. This edition includes the impacts of the customs, VAT and excise regulations laid before Parliament in February, March and September 2019, and the EU Withdrawal Act 2018, and adds to the impacts that were published on 25 February 2019.

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, the customs, VAT and excise arrangements in place as a result of the UK being part of the EU will no longer apply. The UK would no longer be subject to EU law and new legislation will be needed to replicate the current rules for trade with non-EU countries, ensuring that this also applies to EU trade. VAT and excise legislation will need to be amended to reflect the fact that the UK is no longer part of the EU.

One section relevant for the ferry industry is C1 (ii and iii) “Movement of goods from roll on roll off ports”.

IN THE MEDIA

By | 2019 Newsletter week 18 | No Comments

UK Government Cancels Brexit Ferry Deals

The UK Department for Transport is cancelling contracts to provide extra ferry services after Brexit.
The government bought £89m worth of capacity from Brittany Ferries and DFDS.
Ending the contracts could cost the taxpayer more than £50m.
“We needed to be ready”, said Mr Grayling, the Transport Secretary. The cancelled contracts were part of a £4bn no-deal “insurance policy” the government had put in place.